"A Wind from the South" moves to Amazon.com

by Diane Duane

For quite a long while now, the sold-but-never-published novel A Wind from the South has been available for free on its site at http://raetiantales.blogspot.com, and has done… okay. It’s also recently become available, again for free, at the DianeDuane.com bookstore, and again, has done… okay, but no more than that. It hasn’t been terribly visible to the outside world in either of those venues, perhaps.

So I’ve decided to try an experiment to see if the book’s profile can be raised a little bit. I’m going to move the Kindle / .mobi version of AWFTS over to Amazon.com. Its price there will still be quite low as ebooks go.  ETA, June 2011: Having first made the (previously free) ebook available to a few hundred last-minute downloaders, it was then moved to Amazon in March 2011. For the first month it was offered at a very low price. After a month or so, the price was raised… at which point the book began selling considerably better. Go figure. It may be that when you’re a sufficiently established writer, pricing a book too low sends the wrong message.)

Anyway, the book is now on sale at the DD.com Ebooks Direct store at $3.99. (You can also get it at the Amazon.com Kindle store for slightly more.) .Epub versions of the book will only be available from the Ebooks Direct store, mostly because B&N won’t allow Amazon-style author self-publishing without a US bank account. (The minute they change this policy I’ll be only too happy to sell .epubs out of BN.com.)

The print version of the book remains available for the moment at Lulu.com, but this will be changing, as I get a sense that Amazon’s print side will allow a significantly lower price for paperback versions. I’m investigating this and will do something about it one way or another when we start converting the ebook versions of the Young Wizards international editions to print versions for publication and sale via Amazon.

Thanks, everybody!

*AWFTS was bought once in the UK, by Corgi — where it was set aside after the editors who had championed it departed for greener fields — and twice in Germany, for publishers which each time were bought by larger ones, and had their lists of books-to-be-published completely reorganized by new incoming staff who wanted to set their own marks on the new, reorganized houses’ lists. It happens…

You may also like